Understanding Sexual Harasement and Providing a Comfortable Work Place for all our Employees 


The modules in E Light University are presented to help you continue and supplement your education. Each module will explore several aspects of a single subject. You may contact me, Ted Smith, at tsmith@elightelectric.com with any questions. I encourage you to ask questions.

This module provides information from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on the subject of Sexual Harassment . After reading the material presented, take the 'Understanding Sexual Harassment' test and answer all ten (10) questions. Click on the 'Submit' button to send for your test results. Please allow 3 working days to receive your test results.

After completing this module successfully with a passing score of 80% you will receive an E Light Electric Services Certificate of Completion. NOTE: PLEASE READ THE IMPORTANT INFORMATION BELOW!

NOTE: If you are a Supervisor or a Manager employed by E Light Electric Services in the State of California you must complete a separate training, 'Harassment Prevention in the Workplace: California Edition'. That training meets the requirements of the January 1, 2015 and April 1, 2016 amendments to the Fair Employment and Housing Act regulations.

Please contact Roseanne Mullis with the E Light Electric Services Human Resource Department at rmullis@elightelectric.com to schedule the 'Harassment Prevention in the Workplace: California Edition' training that is required by the State of California.

Please note that the E Light Electric Services 'Understanding Sexual Harassment' Certificate of Completion does not meet the requirements of the State of California and cannot be used as a substitute for that special training.
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Director of Safety and Loss Prevention
1. It is unlawful to tease a person or applicant because of that persons:
2. Which of the following does harassment include?
3. Harassment needs to be sexual in nature in order to be considered harassment:
4. Which one of the following could be considered a harasser within the working environment?
5. Which of the following circumstances constitutes sexual harassment?
6. The victim should not inform the harasser directly that the conduct is unwelcome:
7. What is the best tool to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace?
8. What is a good example of a way to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace?
9. When an employee complains, the employer should:
10. What is it considered when an employee comes forward with a complaint and then coworkers          treat them poorly by ignoring them and snickering around them?
Please enter your first name and last name.
Please enter your email address:
Training Department
Understanding Sexual Harassment and Providing a Comfortable Work Place for all of our Employees
Understanding Sexual Harassment Module Test *

* Please note that the E Light Electric Services 'Understanding Sexual Harassment Module' Certificate of Completion does not meet the requirements of the State of California and cannot be used as a substitute for that special training.

Please contact Roseanne Mullis with the E Light Electric Services Human Resource Department at rmullis@elightelectric.com to schedule the 'Harassment Prevention in the Workplace: California Edition' training that is required by the State of California.

This page was last updated: July 20, 2017
Sexual Harassment

(...The following material is taken from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission)

It is unlawful to harass a person (...an applicant or an employee) because of that person’s gender. Harassment can include “sexual harassment” or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature.

Harassment does not have to be of a sexual nature, however, and can include offensive remarks about a person’s sex. For example, it is illegal to harass a woman by making offensive comments about women in general.

Both victim and the harasser can be either a woman or a man, and the victim and harasser can be the same sex.

Although the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).

The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer

Facts About Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees, including state and local governments. It also applies to employment agencies and to labor organizations, as well as to the federal government.

Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.

Sexual harassment can occur in a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to the following:
•The victim as well as the harasser may be a woman or a man. The victim does not have to be of the opposite sex.
•The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee.
•The victim does not have to be the person harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.
•Unlawful sexual harassment may occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim.
•The harasser's conduct must be unwelcome.

It is helpful for the victim to inform the harasser directly that the conduct is unwelcome and must stop. The victim should use any employer complaint mechanism or grievance system available.

When investigating allegations of sexual harassment, EEOC looks at the whole record: the circumstances, such as the nature of the sexual advances, and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred. A determination on the allegations is made from the facts on a case-by-case basis.

Prevention is the best tool to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace. Employers are encouraged to take steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring. They should clearly communicate to employees that sexual harassment will not be tolerated. They can do so by providing sexual harassment training to their employees and by establishing an effective complaint or grievance process and taking immediate and appropriate action when an employee complains.

It is also unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on sex or for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under Title VII.


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